MichaelClimek
thedailybadass:

Puppy Pile!  Now that CeCe and the Halloween puppies have all been adopted, it’s time to get  ready for our Christmas pups!  Dancer had a litter just a few days after Christmas.  Here they are taking a group snooze.  These little guys will be old enough to come North for adoption in about 6 - 8 weeks.
If you’re interested in one of these puppies, get your applications in now.  Email adopt@badassbk.com

thedailybadass:

Puppy Pile!  Now that CeCe and the Halloween puppies have all been adopted, it’s time to get  ready for our Christmas pups!  Dancer had a litter just a few days after Christmas.  Here they are taking a group snooze.  These little guys will be old enough to come North for adoption in about 6 - 8 weeks.

If you’re interested in one of these puppies, get your applications in now.  Email adopt@badassbk.com

In other news -

GEAUX TIGERS!

Radian6 Test

MichaelClimek and Michael Climek like to test the viablity of Radian6

thedailywhat:

It’s Sundog!
[arbroath]

thedailywhat:

It’s Sundog!

[arbroath]

thedailywhat:

Intense Internet Infographic of the Day: A staggering glimpse at the Internet, by the minute.[dvice]

thedailywhat:

Intense Internet Infographic of the Day: A staggering glimpse at the Internet, by the minute.

[dvice]

lsuverse:

Mike! What are you doing?!!

thedailywhat:

Independence Day Tribute of the Day: Just because the guys at Epic Meal Time are from Canada, doesn’t mean they can’t honor America’s Revolutionary War triumph with 1776 period dress and a meal of wild game — bison, deer, rabbit… and bacon.

[vvv]

life:

Today marks 41 years since the death of Jim Morrison.Remember his legacy by turning on your favorite Doors album and looking through these vivid color portraits of the 24-year-old rocker for a 1968 LIFE shoot.

life:

Today marks 41 years since the death of Jim Morrison.

Remember his legacy by turning on your favorite Doors album and looking through these vivid color portraits of the 24-year-old rocker for a 1968 LIFE shoot.


The Camera Queen
Margaret Bourke-White, who saw beauty in the lines of a steel girder and the blackness of a coal mine, pioneers a new era of photography.
by Richard H. Parke
WHEN I called on Margaret Bourke-White in her spacious penthouse studio in a Fifth Avenue office building, she had just returned to New York from photographing a new textile mill in the South. Piled high in the center of the vast room was the equipment she had carried with her: A couple of cameras, a box of flashlight bulbs, a folded tripod and three or four travel-scarred suitcases. To me, they represented Exhibit A in the fast-accumulating evidence to prove that this dark-eyed, intense young woman is one of the world’s greatest photographers. I saw in them the spirit of adventure and pioneering which is the secret of her success, the same spirit which led her to go to New York ten years ago and embark on the development of an idea which was peculiarly her own.
Briefly, that idea was that there is beauty in industry—a beauty that lies in the clean-cut lines of a steel girder, the towering majesty of a city skyscraper, the shower of sparks from a blazing coke oven, the sombre blackness of a coal mine. She knew that the faces of factory workers could wear the nobility of statesmen, that farmers could plow their fields with the grace of athletes and that the skill in a workman’s toss of a red-hot rivet could be compared with the marksmanship of a rifleman.
Read the rest of the article here.

The Camera Queen

Margaret Bourke-White, who saw beauty in the lines of a steel girder and the blackness of a coal mine, pioneers a new era of photography.

by Richard H. Parke

WHEN I called on Margaret Bourke-White in her spacious penthouse studio in a Fifth Avenue office building, she had just returned to New York from photographing a new textile mill in the South. Piled high in the center of the vast room was the equipment she had carried with her: A couple of cameras, a box of flashlight bulbs, a folded tripod and three or four travel-scarred suitcases.

To me, they represented Exhibit A in the fast-accumulating evidence to prove that this dark-eyed, intense young woman is one of the world’s greatest photographers. I saw in them the spirit of adventure and pioneering which is the secret of her success, the same spirit which led her to go to New York ten years ago and embark on the development of an idea which was peculiarly her own.

Briefly, that idea was that there is beauty in industry—a beauty that lies in the clean-cut lines of a steel girder, the towering majesty of a city skyscraper, the shower of sparks from a blazing coke oven, the sombre blackness of a coal mine. She knew that the faces of factory workers could wear the nobility of statesmen, that farmers could plow their fields with the grace of athletes and that the skill in a workman’s toss of a red-hot rivet could be compared with the marksmanship of a rifleman.

Read the rest of the article here.

doctorwho:

Weeping Angels Voted the Scariest Ever Doctor Who Monster 
According to the BBC Doctor Who Blog:

Three weeks ago we provided a list of the Doctor’s most frightening foes and your votes established that the Weeping Angels, the Vashta Nerada and the Silence were top in the scary stakes with the Daleks gliding into fourth place.
The following week we ran a straight poll where the vote was exclusively between the top three monsters. The Vashta Nerada took an early lead but then the Lonely Assassins quickly left them for dust!
In the end, the Weeping Angels were your landslide winners with the Vashta Nerada in second place and the Silence fractionally behind them to claim third spot.
So, what is it that makes the Weeping Angels quite so scary?
Jacob told us, ‘The reason the Weeping Angels are so scary is because statues are a part of everyday life’ and Aoife agreed, saying ‘There are stone statues everywhere, and it’s so hard not to blink!’
Rain called them ‘deliciously creepy’, Tristan labelled them ‘absolutely bone chilling’ and Lauren declared ‘The Weeping Angels are one of the many reasons why Doctor Who is so great!’
But the final word goes to Liv who wrote, ‘The Weeping Angels are so scary due to the fact that they attack when you least expect it. One minute they’re lovely and angelic, the next they bare [their] fangs and killer claws. I can’t even look at a statue without considering if it’s an Angel, so I force myself not to blink… NO ONE IS SAFE FROM THOSE WEEPING ANGELS!!!’

doctorwho:

Weeping Angels Voted the Scariest Ever Doctor Who Monster

According to the BBC Doctor Who Blog:

Three weeks ago we provided a list of the Doctor’s most frightening foes and your votes established that the Weeping Angels, the Vashta Nerada and the Silence were top in the scary stakes with the Daleks gliding into fourth place.

The following week we ran a straight poll where the vote was exclusively between the top three monsters. The Vashta Nerada took an early lead but then the Lonely Assassins quickly left them for dust!

In the end, the Weeping Angels were your landslide winners with the Vashta Nerada in second place and the Silence fractionally behind them to claim third spot.

So, what is it that makes the Weeping Angels quite so scary?

Jacob told us, ‘The reason the Weeping Angels are so scary is because statues are a part of everyday life’ and Aoife agreed, saying ‘There are stone statues everywhere, and it’s so hard not to blink!’

Rain called them ‘deliciously creepy’, Tristan labelled them ‘absolutely bone chilling’ and Lauren declared ‘The Weeping Angels are one of the many reasons why Doctor Who is so great!’

But the final word goes to Liv who wrote, ‘The Weeping Angels are so scary due to the fact that they attack when you least expect it. One minute they’re lovely and angelic, the next they bare [their] fangs and killer claws. I can’t even look at a statue without considering if it’s an Angel, so I force myself not to blink… NO ONE IS SAFE FROM THOSE WEEPING ANGELS!!!’